Why Does My Therapist Ask me About My Family?

Why Does My Therapist Ask me About My Family?

When in the beginning stages of rehab treatment, talking about your personal life may feel uncomfortable. But your therapist must find out as much as she can about you and your unique situation if treatment is to be successful. Dr. Dennis O’Grady, PsyD for PsychCentral, describes therapy as the fine art of asking directive questions.[i] The questions therapists use help them to determine the right treatment plan for you. Because your family is such an integral part of your life, your therapist must learn as much about your family dynamic as...

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The Relief of Not Being in Complete Control

The Relief of Not Being in Complete Control

Feeling the need to be in control all of the time can create a high level of stress. For those who are overwhelmed by the urge to control everyone and everything in life, depression and addiction can be right around the corner. No one person can dictate and control each of life’s events, and needing to do so can actually be a sign of fear or a negative self-image. When a person releases the need to control and learns to take life as it comes, his or her stress level is greatly reduced. It may seem like the opposite will happen, but learning...

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How to Accept Good with the Bad

How to Accept Good with the Bad

When someone struggles with substance abuse, she often struggles to see life through any other lens but how addiction is impacting her life, so changing negative thought patterns into positive ones is a part of the rehab process. Treatment starts you or a loved one on the path to a drug-free life, but maintaining a positive outlook can be difficult during the early days of recovery. You may find it difficult to accept good times if you remember that struggles will still come, but a positive reaction to problems will always make it easier to...

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Does My Addiction to My Depression Meds Count as a Dual Diagnosis?

Does My Addiction to My Depression Meds Count as a Dual Diagnosis?

The Mayo Clinic defines depression as a mood disorder that causes persistent feelings of sadness and loss of interest in everyday activities.[i] Depression affects every aspect of your life, including how you think, feel and respond to situations on a daily basis. Depression is different from just having the blues, and is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. Depression, or major depressive disorder, requires both medication and psychotherapy for successful treatment. But the medications associated with treatment for depression are...

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The Value of Support When Coping with Depression and Anxiety

The Value of Support When Coping with Depression and Anxiety

Depression is a serious mental illness that can debilitate patients if it is not properly treated. However, as with most illnesses, having the right support in place when dealing with depression can increase the likelihood of recovery. Understand what depression is and how it can affect the mind, body and daily life of those who struggle to help yourself or a loved one find the recovery you crave. Depression Explained According to the National Institute of Mental Health[i], medication, psychotherapies and other counseling and therapeutic...

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4 Reasons Addiction Is Considered a Disease

4 Reasons Addiction Is Considered a Disease

The National Institute on Drug Abuse[i] calls addiction a complex brain disease that changes the brain in ways that encourage drug abuse in spite of negative consequences. Drug addiction is not simply a battle of the will over whether or not someone will continue to abuse a substance of choice; rather, the longer substance abuse continues, the more the need for that substance dominates normal brain activity. As a result, drug and alcohol addictions share many characteristics with to other chronic diseases that require medical treatment. Ergo,...

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